DVDs and magic lost

DVDs are wonderful, they provide exceptional video quality for viewing. However, this also works against them in some instances.

Secret Agent, a TV series I particularly enjoy, is an old black and white British series. One of the wonderful things about it was the continually changing story locations. One week the story may take place in Rome, the next in Santiago, the next, Macau.

When I initially watched it over the airwaves, from a PBS station over the border, the image quality was good, but not perfect. This helped to enhance the believability of the exotic locals - almost every episode began with an opening shot of a plane landing in some foreign local.

When I got the DVD set, some of the mystery was lost because it was obvious that sound stages were being used - which was not so obvious from the slightly fuzzier, slightly grainier images coming in over the air.

Comments

Barbara said…
Some things are better just not to know.
Richard said…
I disagree, while knowing may take some of the shine off, I am far more comfortable in having full knowledge than incomplete knowledge.

Learning that Santa Claus is not real may take away some of the magic from Christmas, but it allows us to focus more on the reality.
Cavalock said…
I still haven't forgiven Ted Turner for colorizing all those B&W classics. hah

i suppose u heard when they are doing to the classic Trek DVDs? The CGI enhanced High-Def special editions.
it's human nature to like the unchanged versions with which we originally viewed things. I love Lucy, The Three Stooges, Gone With The Wind are a few examples that come to mind...and the biggest is A Christmas Carol with Alastair Simms...well, it's just gotta be in original B&W!!!
Steve said…
That's interesting. I never actually thought about that, that new technology could eradicate the mystery of something such you described.

I'm a big fan of black and white films, but also color. Many people think that we got color films in the 50's or so, with the help of technicolor, but if you take a look at the early silent films, dating back a hundred years, you'll find color there too.
Richard said…
cavalock: I heard the were supposed to be issuing remastered Star Trek for the 40th anniversary. I had not heard about enhanced CGI. It would not be a bad idea if it keeps with the look and feel of the original series. Let's face it, shots of the shuttlecraft have that embarrassing light coloured block that tracks it as it moves. Also some phaser effects could definitely be cleaned up.

I don't suppose you have seen the Doctor Who colourization. Even gives tips on how to do it.

I always found colourization disappointing because the colours are not as vibrant. Mind you, I did see a coloured version of Metropolis years ago and enjoyed it (rather than being shown solely in black and white, they tinted it, but the effect was still a monochromatic film).

MOI: there is no question that we are naturally drawn to that which we find familiar and comfortable. Of course, at some point it becomes routine and uninteresting because there is nothing new, there is no growth.

matt: It was a bit of a shock to me, because I honestly thought they did a lot of location filming. However, the series is still excellent, even if some of the magic is lost.
Richard said…
cavalock: I heard the were supposed to be issuing remastered Star Trek for the 40th anniversary. I had not heard about enhanced CGI. It would not be a bad idea if it keeps with the look and feel of the original series. Let's face it, shots of the shuttlecraft have that embarrassing light coloured block that tracks it as it moves. Also some phaser effects could definitely be cleaned up.

I don't suppose you have seen the Doctor Who colourization. Even gives tips on how to do it.

I always found colourization disappointing because the colours are not as vibrant. Mind you, I did see a coloured version of Metropolis years ago and enjoyed it (rather than being shown solely in black and white, they tinted it, but the effect was still a monochromatic film).

MOI: there is no question that we are naturally drawn to that which we find familiar and comfortable. Of course, at some point it becomes routine and uninteresting because there is nothing new, there is no growth.

matt: It was a bit of a shock to me, because I honestly thought they did a lot of location filming. However, the series is still excellent, even if some of the magic is lost.

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